#TAG2013: Visualisation as Knowledge Creation – Session Summary

I’ve compiled together my notes and tweets from the Seeing, Doing, Thinking: Visualisation as Knowledge Creation session at the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference (#TAG2013) held in Bournemouth this week. I was planning to live blog, but the session was so engrossing that I am afraid I managed just a few tweets and scribbled thoughts in the end!

I was presenting a project that I have been working on with Jude Jones. She is the brains behind the whole thing, I have merely been helping with computational photography! The paper about the project has yet to be written, but we are busy plotting, so watch this space!

We were talking about the potential of RTI as a form of visualisation for reading the tomb of Dame Mary May which is situated in a small and very lovely church in Lavant, near Chichester, West Sussex.

More about that in a soon to be written blog post, but first I’ve copied in my tweets and accompanying notes from the session. These are scruffy at best, but at least they give an idea of the fantastic papers that we enjoyed.

The session organisers (Gareth Beale, Sara Perry and Catriona Cooper) maintain a blog which pulls together all of the various activities surrounding the Seeing, Thinking, Doing idea, the TAG2013 session being just one of these events, so do check out their blog for more information: http://seeingthinkingdoing.wordpress.com/

Tweets from Session

Paper abstracts here: http://seeingthinkingdoing.wordpress.com/tag-2013-bournemouth/

Session Introductions

We’re just starting in the #visualarchaeo session at #TAG2013. Visualisation and Archaeology. V exciting!

Rachel Opitz

RachelOpitz on #crowdsourcing Pictish stones: Online to real world. http://www.pictishpuzzle.co.uk  but you’ll need WebGL! #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

RachelOpitz talking about choice in viz. Discussing different types of #saliency for highlighting interpretation. #visualarchaeo

Mahiri Maxwell

MahiriMaxwell of #Glenmorangie at #NtlMuseumsScot. Starting with 3D visualisation as craft. Brilliant! #visualarchaeo  #TAG2013

James Taylor

JamesTaylor, @uniofyork. On digital recording as reflexive process. #catalhoyuk‘s stratigraphic sequence as testbed. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Jamie Hampson

JamieHampson touching on #IPinCH issues. Finding representations of #rockart in #SL#visualarchaeo #TAG2013 “Don’t just gaze and guess”.

JamieHampson: Manifestation rather than representation in #rockart. Considering rock surface & the paint being used. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

JamieHampson on rock art as a process. What is the ‘art’ in ‘rockart’? Considering orality as well as visuality. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

JamieHampson of @UWAnews on #occularcentrism in #rockart interp. ‘Reading’ #rockart as text. Is there a semantics? #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Matthew Harrison

@MattJ_Harrison on filtering data through visualisations and on translating visualisations. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

@MattJ_Harrison on viz of Fustat. Using topography (not neces cartographic) & topology (relationships & entities) #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Discussion

Q from discussion: Is visualisation a simplification or is it an augmentation to other data representation? #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

A shout out to @lparchaeology‘s multivocality of the record as part of discussion part 1 at #visualarchaeo #TAG2013 Yay guys!

So many faces on one screen. Enjoying the GoogleHangout at #visualarchaeo #TAG2013 pic.twitter.com/ojLpy8U5lI

My fav. bit of #visualarchaeo so far… @MattJ_Harrison on visualisation as a filter for data. #TAG2013

@GCBeale asking how we are publishing visualisations. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Sorin Hermon

Tablet as user interface btwn digital world & real world. Lots of tablet-love in #visualarchaeo this aft. #TAG2013 pic.twitter.com/UKDLHC2zDs

SorinHermon reminds us about the importance of including #paradata about the human processes, the interpretation. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

SorinHermon reiterates importance of the #LondonCharter for viz and of the portability & flexibility of #CIDOCCRM#visualarchaeo #TAG2013

SorinHermon on fuzzy logic and classification with ontologies #CIDOCCRM for quantifying reliability of a 3D model. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Neha Gupta

Additional info for post-session Googling:Neha is NehaGupta: http://cal.mcgill.ca/htdocs/index.php/who/neha-gupta … #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Neha on use of spatial approach partic. geovis of patterns to challenge monolithic govt control of cultural heritage #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Jude Jones and Nicole Beale

RTI is described by #culturalheritageimaging http://culturalheritageimaging.org  Watch @ArchCRG blog for MaryMay outputs. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Robin Skeates

RobinSkeates on SuzannePsalia’s use of archaeoengineering & 3Dviz 2 reflect multiple interpretations of Maltese site #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

RobinSkeates of @durham_uni on critiquing aesthetics & archaeo. Visualist bias of terminologies like ‘focus’ ‘view’ #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Alex Zambelli

Great images by @a_zambelli overlaying historical and contemporary architectures of the choreography of London Stone #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

@a_zambelli up now. The Moves of London Stone. VERY EXCITED about this talk. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Ian Dawson and Louisa Minkin

Enjoying the poetry of LouisaMinkin and @demondawson‘s presentation. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013 pic.twitter.com/1chnyPOInd

@demondawson & LouisaMinkin on the wonderful understatement of the magic of #photosculpture & on accidentaloutputs #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

The work that we did with @demondawson and LouisaMinkin is described in our #EVALondon paper: http://ewic.bcs.org/content/ConWebDoc/51037 … #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

@demondawson and LouisaMinkin now up. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013 pic.twitter.com/JR8slWzhd2

Discussion

Importance of paradata for 3D viz. highlighted. #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

@demondawson on importance of having transparent decision making process 4 artwork making 4 backtracking & recreate #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Erin on how incorporating multiple senses: sound is action & visual can b static. You need movement 4 noise creation #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

On subj of stone balls, AndyJones will talk tmw abt art practice as an alternate process of archaeological fieldwork #visualarchaeo #TAG2013

Digital Futures 2012 – Day 1

Digital Futures 2012

Tweeting Note: I’ve stopped tweeting during the papers as there is a screen underneath the speakers showing all of the #de2012 hashtag tweets, which I’m finding really distracting. So I’m afraid no more tweets from me during the papers, but I’ll try to tweet in the breaks, and will blog instead.

Tuesday 23rd October 2012

#de2012

These are my scruffy notes from the first day at DE2012. I haven’t blogged the talks in detail, as all of the papers are available on the http://de2012.org website, so you can read them there. What follows is merely my own notes on the parts of the conference that I have found most useful.

Keynote: Edward Cutrell: Innovating in India: Disruptive Technology for the Developing World

Edward Cutrell (@edcutrell) of Microsoft Research India, gave an interesting talk about some of the projects that the organisation has been involved in. I live tweeted from this one, so have copied the tweets in below:

@edcutrell of #microsoftresearchindia at #de2012 telling about evaluating prototypes for expanding communities and then scaling with orgs.
@edcutrell at #de2012: We go from technology to people then back to technology again. #CGNetSwara for #citizenjournalism sounds v. cool.
@edcutrell at #de2012. Alternative to #onelaptoponechild. Have multiple pointers for multiple users for one pc. For collaborative learning.
@edcutrell of #microsoftresearchindia at #de2012. Look up #MultiPoint for info on project. Continuum of sharing: i.e. split screens.
@edcutrell at #de2012 now talking about micro finance self help groups in india. Creating digital records without moving away from paper.
@edcutrell #de2012 Trialled mapping a standardised form onto a tablet/digital slate. Uses audio validation. Improved accuracy & efficiency.
@edcutrell #de2012 Actually audio output proved very popular; Particularly for illiterate members. Paper copy still important bec tangible.
@edcutrell at #de2012 But slates are expensive… Cue Android phones.
@edcutrell #de2012 #CGNetSwara now: “Voice is the most important thing in the developing works right now.” Mobile internet not that common.
@edcutrell #de2012: How do you manage communicating via system where language literacy’s so mixed? 25% no literacy 25% Eng. 25% Other lang.
@edcutrell #de2012 A voice-based wiki for citizen journalism. Great oral histories! Transcribed online. But users don’t have web access.
@edcutrell #de2012 So I wonder does this voice wiki have a use for inadvertent political activism?
@edcutrell #de2012 Find this citizen journalism project: http://cgnetswara.org  Do you give people a voice if they can’t access the platform?
@edcutrell at #de2012: #ivrjunction is the platform for the system for citizen journalism. They’re looking for partners!
@edcutrell #de2012 Q&A now. On economic bus. models: Cutrell says there is no resistance to new tech. But additional work not appreciated.
@edcutrell #de2012 On justifying to stakeholders why R&D should happen. Unanticipated devs of course!
Ditto! MT:@PaulWatsonNcl: #de2012 Enjoyed @EdCutrell talk on MSR India.Exploiting low-tech solns, integrating w. current customs & practice

Session 1B: Tales of Engagement

Maria Angela Ferrario (Jon Whittle, Erinma Ochu, Jen Southern, Ruth McNally): Beyond Research in the Wild: Citizen-Led Research as a Model for Innovation in the Digital Economy

The #CATALYSTAS

Team use PROTEE project management approach.

Sprint teams has same core panel members, but bring in others from the wider #CATALYSTAS network. Impressive NodesXL visualisation of the network on Twitter.

The team ask for submissions from organisations who would like a Sprint event to create something that is easy to make but deals with a difficult issue. Organisations do not need to submit a complication proposal, only a paragraph is needed. The panel selects a project to carry out. The team have completed seven projects, only one wasn’t suggested by this method.

Patchworks with Signposts

Example or an organisation supporting homeless people in Lancaster, called Signposts.

The project used RFIDs and Thermo Mini Printer to create a printer of timetables for visitors to Signposts.

Find it

The project is extended very soon in MOSI, Manchester in the form of a treasure hunt using RFID tags that explores the difficulties in locating resources that homeless people encounter. Look on the MOSI website for ‘#Pat Goes Wild’. See also #Patchworks

@catalystproj

http://catalystproject.org.uk/

Marianne Dee on Tales of Technology

@SiDEResearch – has drop in centre in Dundee. With a focus on access to technology. Has a research pool of 800 users and 40 organisations to take part in research. Great for user perspectives.

The Tales of Technology project collected positive stories about use of technologies. The stories were recorded from a call out to all 800 users via email and newsletter.  Many responded by email, some by post. 80 respondents. Many felt that their use of technologies was not notable, but it became clear during the recorded interviews that there were lots of unexpected brilliant positive stories.

Marianne told two great stories. Adam was interested in genealogy so searched for people who shared his surname through the internet and then emailed them all. Over a period of time he communicated with relations in lots of different countries and then via email invited 70 people to Scotland to visit their ancestral home. The visitors had a big impact on the local economy.

Marianne also told a great story about a lady who lost her husband who left a large collection of books. She decided to sell the books on Amazon (having decided that eBay was too complicated to use). Following her success, she started to buy books in secondhand and charity shops to sell through Amazon. She has never bought a single thing on Amazon, but has sold thousands of books.

The videos have been transcribed and have subtitles.

Questions to consider

How does the project fit into social mobility?

Access to community groups?

Is there a model here for sharing stories and for giving training to people for using technologies?

Favourite Idea

The stories will be linked to information about the technologies mentioned in the videos, therefore providing a way to join up technologies with user experiences.

Digital Storytelling Model – and how to craft these.

Find it

They’re on YouTube, and then project has a website currently at: http://tinyurl.com/talesoftechnology/ But soon to be at http://talesoftechnology.co.uk

#talesoftech

Olga Fernholz: Innovation for Today While Innovating for Tomorrow. Perspectives on Building Ambidextrous Organisation

HORIZON, Nottingham.

Innovative Management

Olga talked about one of her case studies: Ordnance Survey. Olga interviewed 5 managers at OS, interested in the Agency of Leaders.

Innovative Ambidexterity:

Exploitation Exploration
Products Processes
Manipulating existing technologies/skills Shifting to new technologies/skills
OSMasterMapOSVectorMap District Linked Data Web – GeoVationOpen Data

Favourite Idea

Are exploitation and exploration mutually exclusive?

Connected Digital Economy Catapult Information Session

I attended the lunchtime briefing on the DE catapult for Connected Digital Economy. It was really interesting to hear about this scheme. I haven’t written notes as I found this pretty comprehensive record of the scheme elsewhere: https://connect.innovateuk.org/c/document_library/get_file?p_l_id=6593370&folderId=9473587&name=DLFE-103319.pdf

Workshop 5 (WS5): Harnessing the Power of Storytelling in the Digital Economy

Stephann Makri: Storytelling in Research

Identifying serendipity through storytelling. Carried out critical incident interviews as storytelling for data collection.

Interviewing techniques for conversational approaches to encouraging storytelling.  Stephann would summarise the story, email it to the participant, who could amend the record if they chose to do so.

How do we summarise? This is the data analysis part. By identifying patterns in the circumstances:

  1. Unexpected circumstances
  2. Insight (lightbulb moment)
  3. Valuable and unanticipated outcome

Presenting data: Multiple options: YouTube stories, narrated stories, illustrated stories, radio stories, poster stories. And finally, exploiting findings through drama.

Favourite Idea

Reflecting on stories, to reveal a metalayer on serendipity as a phenomenon.

Find it

See http://youtube.com/serendipiTV

http://serendipitystories.net/

http://serena.ac.uk/

Ruth Aylett

Heriott Watt University & SAGE

Persuasion: education can be about attitudes and behaviour as well as knowledge.  In schools, this takes the form of PSHE. In adults, this could be education of health.

Storytelling as a narrative loop. The loop is important. Linking events emotionally.

World state changes, causes Actions causes Affective Change, causes Events causes World state changes.

Persuasion is all about affective change. But there is a disconnect between story and reality.

One way to do this is to use role play. Experiential learning. Need a facilitator. Development of perspective taking. Thinking differently about points of view. Creation of empathy is essential. It won’t work if it is too predictable, or if it is too formulaic, or if the immersion is broken.

Sense of presence:

  • Summon up visualisation
  • Events fitting with logic of world
  • Challenges for user
  • Characters for feeling of social presence – it matters what you do; actions impact on characters. There are consequences.

You have to care about the digital character. Emotional involvement fostering.

Davis, 1994: Empathy is Cognitive (knowing) / Affective (experiencing).

Ruth gave the example of the FearNot project (virtual exploration of bullying for 9-11 year olds) and ORIENT project (Wii remotes on a large screen).

FearNot Project

Empathic agents – influencing behaviours.

Check out the RIDERS, http://riders-project.net, the next event is at QMUL.

Discussion Group

We split into groups to discuss how we used storytelling in our own research. Our group came up with the following uses that take place:

  1. Processes
  2. Inputs
  3. Outputs

And under these headings, we used storytelling for:

  • Reflection
  • Teaching
  • Communication of Work
  • Justification
  • Relationship Building
  • Story from Stories
  • Exploration
  • Different Audiences
  • Freeform

The other groups talked about:

  1. Validation of the story that you might tell. Cross-validation/triangulation from other sources.
  2. Mediating technologies to tell stories (tweets, photos, etc.).
  3. Different cultures for storytelling
  4. Different user groups – narrators, entrepreneurs, etc.

Colin Case

Colin facilitated an activity where we played the game Consequences, but using a conversation between a computer and a human. Then we discussed how collaborative storytelling occurs, in particular the role of chance and serendipity in this process.

Discussion

We had a really good discussion at the end of the session for 15 minutes about the shift in focus from narrative to storytelling. Is this reflective of the shift in general? In museums, there is certainly much written about the shift from museum as knowledge producer, to the museum as a space/place/agent to facilitate knowledge production by/with audiences. E.g. User Generated Content.

Narrative is what you end up with when you combine:

  1. Story as collection
  2. Discourse is how it is expressed.

There is more of the author in storytelling than in narrative.

Passive Audience of… Active Participant in…
NARRATIVE STORYTELLING
Engineered artefact Doing

Questions

What is the impact of storytelling?

Digital Economy Impact Panel Results

At the end of the day, I managed to get to the presentation on the results of the DE Impact Panel Review.  This has been the most thought provoking thing so far at #de2012 for me.

Paul Nightingale began the session.

Research to Practice takes time. We should get the research out there and ensure that VALUE is realised in society.

Haldane idea that Government doesn’t choose research may hold true, but impact will ensure funding from the Government.

Science Research Council, 1965: Achieving impact focus early on.

In the UK, DE is having a tangible impact on:

  • UK economy
  • UK society
  • UK research community

Findings:

  1. DE – internationally excellent quality. UK research is in a leadership position.
  2. Quality of many of the students is ‘stella’. Beyond internationally excellent.
  3. Doesn’t neglect fundamental research because of applied focus.
  4. Was evidence of impact – but too early to assess.

BUT…

Need to manage impact more strategically: Record, measure, communicate.

Some other thoughts from Paul Nightingale:

—  Monitoring process should be lightweight (when its going well!).

—  Cross portfolio networking

—  Academic research feeding into public policy debates is on Radio 4 all the time. Yet the average-spend on social sciences research for each UK resident is less than a gin and tonic worth per year.

—  Impact doesn’t happen at the end of a research project.

—  Early engagement is key.

Andrew Herbert then arrived and added the following thoughts:

—  Impact opportunistic. We’re not managing for it. There are no impact strategies. I.e. if you have a good idea, who do you tell? What/where do you go with it?

—  Too much digital, very little economy.

—  Define measurable desired long range target:

  • Goal to measure
  • You can see how you get there
  • Stages to get there (clear milestones with evaluation)

—  Link research and training strategies.

—  Business management and researchers needed. To think about:

  • IP
  • SWOT
  • Partner Relationships
  • Policy Input Development

— Attraction of critical mass is important

— Steering Boards with teeth as a model. Like an executive director. Keeping the PIs on track.

— Soft money is very important.

I’ve not been able to track down a digital copy of the report yet, but as soon as I do, I will put a link here.

Wednesday 24th October 2012

Today promises to be another interesting day, with poster presentations, a Dragons Den competition, and what look to be some great sessions. I will probably write up my notes for today on the train home tomorrow evening, so do look out for those here sometime on Thursday.

#SxSC2

Tomorrow I am going to be at the Creative Digifest #SxSC2 event at the University of Southampton.

Digital Economy USRG University of Southampton

The full schedule is available here: http://digitaleconomy.soton.ac.uk/events/1313

I’m not sure yet exactly what I am going to be talking about… As its a fantastic event for meeting new people and finding out about cool projects, I’ll probably be talking about various projects that I’m involved in and perhaps seeing if anyone is interested in getting involved in the strategy for social media working group.

Be great to see you there. It’s going to be a fun day, with lots of different presenters and demonstrators from across (and outside of) the university.  Some of the Web Science PhD students are going to be presenting posters, which promises to be really interesting stuff.

More information can be found on the sotonDE (Digital Economies at University of Southampton) website: http://digitaleconomy.soton.ac.uk/tag/sxsc2/